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them to bring it back into the united states that the condition that they invest in excellent capital in the united states. we tried to repatriation in 2004 and companies brought back the money and went out to shareholders and there is no actual investments in expansion of capital equipment, so i think having a compromise where you allow companies to repatriate the money coming out of the 35% tax rate, but maybe 10% to 12%, the tie that with actual metrics of expanding the workforce or investment in the united states is something we're looking at. secondly, i am president obama's proposal is a tax credit for companies to bring manufacturing back or invest back in the united states in communities and create jobs and proposed a 20% tax credit for those types of companies. why do you cut the corporate tax rate across the board? my argument for that is i don't think right now that either my law firm was investment bank of wall street needs that. i say let's target to areas that are in economic growth. so i am sympathetic to taxiing if they can be tied to accountability for companies to ac
managerial job in the world, president of the united states, leader of the free world. my question was how does he do it? how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not the context of the decisions, that's interesting, too, but what is the leadership style? i looked around for books a serious sustained way. >> host: do you see this as a campaign document coming out very close to the elections? >> guest: they do like to time things when people are paying attention and most americans tune in to politics around election time. >> host: each one of the things the with surprise to readers use it twice in the book those democrats this is a very critical study of the obama leadership all of the sources were democrat. tell us about that decision. >> guest: some of the politics longtime technical people in the defense department or the intelligence services and so on but for the most part these are people that worked alongside the president in one capacity or another in the white house and we need federal agencies in the house of congress to see him up close. what i discover
is in the most important managerial job in the world. he is president of the united states leader of the free world and so my question was how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not with the content of the positions are but what is his leadership style? when i looked around for books we looked at this question semiserious and sustained way and they really were none. >> host: do you see this as a campaign coming out close to the american election? >> guest: we do know that most americans do into politics around election time but that is more or less -- is the one of the things that surprised me and will surprise a lot of your readers is that you say twice in the book that all of your sources were democrats and this is a very critical study of obama's leadership that all of your sources for the book were democrats. tell us about that position. >> guest: some of the sources i don't know the politics of who are longtime career technical people and intelligence services and so on but these are people who work alongside the president in one capacity or another in the wh
's in the most managerial job in the world. president of the united states, these are the free world is my question was how does he do it? odyssey make decisions? how does a cover? that's interesting too, but what is his leadership style? when i looked around for books about to dismiss the serious and sustained weight. >> you see this as a campaign document coming up close to the november election? >> guest: well, publishers do like the time for it when attention. most americans tune into politics around election time. that is more or less a happy accident. >> host: one of the things that surprised me and the surprise a lot of the leaders is all of your sources are democrats. this is a very critical study, get all of your sources were democrats. >> guest: some of the sources i don't know the politics of our long-term career and technical people, but for the most part, these are people who work alongside the president and the white house and federal agencies the halls of congress and i got to see him up close. when i discovered much to my surprise is this is an administration that is really
used to describe what the united states has become. he used the word bhutan me. he said the u.s. is now a bhutan me. >> host: a combination of bhutan me and -- >> guest: it's a less excitable work -- word that there are few bhutan amaze amaze around the world characterized by a tremendous concentration of wealth at the top and a wealth that is greater than the bottom 90% of that is what he used. he said that in who is going to buy products and that is who is going to drive the economy, the middle-class is not as important as it once was. >> host: using the book for people who make less than $200,000, they don't count. >> guest: in the eyes of the hedge fund people, these are headphone -- hedge fund people talking. and you can understand where they're coming from. the middle class in china dwarfs the middle class now. the middle class in india, brazil, you name it. and it is why they say the u.s. is irrelevant. >> guest: there are is looking for growth. that is the heart of the whole financial aristocracy. they want growth in stocks and they want the companies that have the multinational
it across the united states at that time. it is pretty cool. . . as people i talked at explained to me why date did anything they were doing and how do you know that nyc do that? at some point they did it because they had always done it that way are they had some kind of rule that was not based on any research and so i sort of one around campaigns with some degree of skepticism about a lot of the practices that were taking place and the way people were spending money and devoting time and resources and as they learned about people starting in academia who were doing randomized controlled trials being adopted by people in the political world and learned more about all that data targeting, based on basically revolutionized campaigns in the last decade, there was a major generational shift in addition to all of the sort of new forms of research changing the way campaigns operated they have this kind of cultural tension between a lot of the old practices in the way campaigns operated in the new empirical movements. so you know i covered the 2000 campaign for the "boston globe" and was out talk
what the united states became using the word "plutonamy." that's less -- let's say excitable word, but his point was, there are a few plutonamy's around the world and its cakessed by a tremendous amount of wealth at the top and a wealth that's greater than the bottom 90%. that's what he used. he said that's who will buy product and who drives the economy and the middle class is just not as important as it was. >> host: for people who make less than $200,000 they don't count. >> guest: they are irrelevant in the eyes of the hedge fund people. these are hedge fund people talking. you can understand where they are coming from. the middle class dwarfs the middle class in india, brazil, you name it. it's why they say the u.s. is irrelevant in that sense. >> guest: they are always looking for growth. that's the heart of the whole financial movement. they want growth. they want growth in stocks. they want the companies that have the multinational connections and operations and revenue streams. that's where they want growth. that's why they see the middle class of china and india in parti
just recording in my mouth at a wall street investment banker used to describe the united states has become. he used the word metonymy. >> host: combination of autocracy -- >> guest: he wanted his own word. it is a less excitable words and plutocracy. at his point was there are a few platonic meets around the world and they are followed by a tremendous concentration of wealth, greater than all in the bottom 90%. and he said that is who's going to buy products. that is who's going to drive the economy. >> host: i think you say in the book for people who make less than $200,000, they don't count. >> guest: and this is in the eyes of the hedge fund people. these are hedge fund people talking. and you can understand why they're coming from. the middle class in china endorse the middle class. middle class in india, brazil, you name it. and that's why they say the u.s. is kind of irrelevant. >> host: thermos looking for growth. that's the part of the whole stock receipt. they want growth with companies took the multinational connect in such operations and revenue streams. that's where they
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8